SCAM ALERT: Leptitox Diet Supplement Rip-Off Revealed

What would you do if you meet a new person and the first thing they say is clearly a lie?  You’d likely runaway.  Well, pretty much the first thing that Leptitoxtells you is a lie;   its alleged creator Morgan Hurst doesn’t exist.   Our advice:  runaway!

Leptitox is one of the newer Internet diet scams looking to sell useless pills with the claim that it’ll guarantee weight-loss.   It won’t.  This scam is yet another one of the weight loss pill schemes that proliferate on the Web.   The sad truth is the “hack” involves ingesting  one of their overpriced placebo supplements.  Their official website also states how it can help reduce hunger, increase metabolism, improve immune function, boost serotonin, support health cholesterol, and reduce blood pressure.  We’re surprised they didn’t throw in “reverse global warming” and “create peace in the Middle East”.   Sadly, the latter two wishes are more likely to occur than you achieving weight loss by popping these expensive pills.

There’s a reason this sales pitch is slick — they spend a lot of marketing money to get it to you.   Who is paying for that?  You are.   And, like many scammers, they are using Clickbank to sell their ebook so don’t assume you’ll get a refund.  “Rock solid guarantee”…..don’t bet on it.   The scammers bet on the fact that most consumers won’t seek refunds until after the 60-day period expires.   In fact, they count on it.

If you look for a review of the product, you are deluged with lots of fake review or “scam” sites that simply direct you to the main sales site or offer some officious pablum talking about how the product is highly rated or recommended.   The marketers for this service pay 75-100% commission for any referrals they generate.   So these “affiliate marketers” create create fake review sites which effectively thwart any customer who is looking for real reviews.   It is also a tactic to obscure any customers who have posted complaints or alerts about fraudulent claims.  This affiliate marketing trick makes it very difficult for consumers to detect this and other such scams,  As one persevering blogger has noted, scam artists rely upon these fraudulent reviewers to be using tags like:  “does it work?”, “is it a scam?” or “verified review” to suck unsuspecting consumers into this fraud.    In the case of the Leptitox, they are offering affiliate marketers $34, or about 50% of the $68.71 they expect to get you to pay.  How can they promise that?   Because they know they’ll be able to upsell — charge you for additional services — the poor folk that fall for this scam.  See this posting below from Clickbank — the company they use to sell this bogus deal:

Why Leptitox Should Be Avoided

So what are you getting for your $25 per month?  (one bottle per two months). The official website won’t reveal any of the “22 nutrients and plant extracts.”  However, other affiliate websites touting these pills list a plethora of ingredients:

  • Jujube
  • Grape Seed
  • Alfalfa
  • Marian Thistle
  • Apium Graveolens Seeds
  • Chanca Piedra
  • Taraxacum Leaves
  • Brassicas
  • Barberry
  • Burdock Root
  • Choline
  • Chicory Root
  • Methionine
  • n-Acetyl

But none of these ingredients have any scientifically proven weight-loss properties. There’s no science to support them and, worse, most all of these offerings are horribly overpriced.   That’s probably one of the reasons that the Federal Trade Commission recently cracked down on the crackpots selling these this supplement.   And the National Institute of Health issued a warning about the use of these supplements.

There is simply inadequate evidence for anyone to make the claims that these  nutrients result in weight loss.  Yet, use of weight-loss supplements in the United States is fairly common.  The government estimates that approximately 15% of U.S. adults have used a weight-loss dietary supplement at some point in their lives. So far, the marketers appear to be winning…..and weight-loss consumers losing.

Other Warning Signs About Leptitox

This diet pill is incredibly expensive for a mere 60-day supply, with a single bottle costing $49 when taking shipping fees into account. The manufacturer states that they offer a money-back guarantee and that customers can try the product 100% risk-free, but this is incredibly misleading, as the return period is only for 15 days and opened products cannot be returned.  So, for your $49+ shipping fees per month, you are being sold a bunch of obscure herbs that probably won’t hurt you, but will set you back some $600 per year.   And the weight loss you experience is more likely to result from changing your food intake than from these placebo pills.

The “creator” of this pill is identified as Morgan Hurst.  But according to Contrahealthscam.com, a credible reviewer of health supplements,  Hurst doesn’t exist.  And the pictures of Hurst are that of a paid actor.  Similarly, the testimonials are apparently faked as well.  And most of the research cited by the marketers apparently doesn’t exist.

How To Identify A Weight Loss Supplement Scam

Weight loss scams are nothing new. In fact, the FTC has been prosecuting false diet claims since 1927. However, the Internet has greatly accelerated the speed and impact of scammer successes by gaining access to wide audiences and making it easy for them to reap large profits.

This blog spends quite a bit of time exposing some of the worst offenders, but we’ve only scratched the surface.  Regulators have the same problem; since 2005, the FTC has brought 82 cases against scammers for using false or unsubstantiated claims about weight-loss products, and yet they continue to proliferate.  We can try to help protect you, but you’ve got to be alert to the sophisticated tricks being used by the weight-loss scammers.   Here are some red-flashing lights to alert you to a probably scam:

  • The product claims you will lose more than one pound per week. Diet experts believe about one pound per week is the ideal rate for healthy weight loss. Any product that claims it can shed weight faster is probably too good to be true.
  • The product advertises you can lose weight without diet or exercise. It’s not fun to hear, but if you really want to lose weight, a diet and exercise are the only proven and healthy paths.
  • Be alert if it claims you can lose weight from a specific part of your body, that a single factor is preventing your weight loss, and/or any advertisement using the words “miracle,” “scientific breakthrough,” or “secret formula.”
  • The pictures accompanying the ads show dramatic “Before” and “After” pictures.
  • Claims that the supplement blocks the absorption of fat or calories to enable consumers to lose substantial weight;
  • Any product that causes substantial weight loss by wearing a product on the body or rubbing it into the skin.
  • Promises substantial weight loss no matter what or how much you eat.

The problem has gotten so severe that Congress has held formal hearings to determine whether new laws would help curtail the scourge of false advertising.   Sadly, the hearings didn’t result in any useful reforms.   But there are a number of things that YOU can do to avoid getting suckered by the weight-loss swindlers.   Just like how magicians don’t want to show you how to do a trick, the scammers don’t want you to know their tricks.   That’s why we are going to bust them and show you their tricks.

TRICK #1 –  Endorsements and Friend Referrals

Advertisers are beginning to realize that Millennials have begun to catch on to the fraudulent ads.  Most young consumers no longer trust ads — instead they rely upon referrals by their friends.    So, the Net shysters have retaliated by creating fake referrals.  That’s why many recent email scams have used Americans’ faith in their loved ones against them by hijacking email addresses to make it look like the scammers’ pitch was coming from a close friend or family member. In addition, these emails send readers to false versions of respected news websites, giving their false claims an air of objectivity, because even people who might not trust Uncle Fred’s diet tips might accept claims made by faux-journalists.

TRICK #2 – Before and After Pictures

The camera never lies….right?  You know better than that.  And when it comes to weight-loss photos and testimonials, you can be sure that the weight-loss tricksters are playing fast and loose with the camera.    Just read two stories:  one by a weight-loss model who was paid to lose weight in 30 days and one by a guy who explains how the camera can be used to fake weight loss.   You’ll never believe a Before and After picture again……nor should you.

These, and other tricks, make it possible to show a 10- to 20-pound weight loss on a scale in a matter of hours.  Dehydration techniques (fasting and spending time in a sauna) used by wrestlers and martial artists has allowed athletes (especially fighters) to lose 13 pounds in 24 hours.  But it’s simply water weight loss, and posture manipulation, both of which are temporary. Yet, these illusions helps sell thousands of weight loss gimmicks every year.

Other fraudsters will use stock photos and alter them.  If you aren’t sure if the images are authentic, use Google images to perform a reverse-image search. Google can show you all the places using a specific picture. The method for doing this varies based upon your Web browser. Just search “Reverse Image Search Google” to quickly find the instructions that will work best for you.

TRICK #3 –  Promise Weight-Loss With No Scientific Support

Like a lot of other Internet scams, Leptitox claims that it will eliminate toxins.  The concept that toxins are behind your weight-gain is a scheme used by snake oil-salesmen to sell products cloaked in pseudoscientific babble on late night television and throughout the Internet.   Untold numbers of believers swear by detoxes and cleanses — a group that includes such celebrities as Dr. Oz, Donna Karan, the Kardashian klan and Gwyneth Paltrow, who recently launched her own $425 goop cleanse.  Yet, it’s all a money-driven myth.  Marketing materials for detox treatments typically describe an array of symptoms and diseases linked to toxin buildup: A few that are general enough to apply to anyone (e.g., headache, fatigue, insomnia, hunger) with a few specifics to frighten you (cancer, etc.) Which toxins cause which disease is missing, and how the toxins cause the symptoms is never actually explained. There’s absolutely no scientific support for most of the “detox systems” and “cleanses” marketed by various companies. The British organisation Sense About Science has described some detox diets and commercial products as “a waste of time and money

Despite the variety of toxins that are claimed to be causing your illness, marketing claims for detox treatments cannot specific toxins to specific symptoms or illnesses. Some detoxification proponents claim that intestinal sluggishness causes intestinal contents to putrefy, toxins are absorbed, and chronic poisoning of the body results. This “autointoxication” theory was popular around the turn of the century but was abandoned by the scientific community during the 1930s. No such “toxins” have ever been found, and careful observations have shown that individuals in good health can vary greatly in bowel habits.

Like Master Cleanse, CleanseSmart, Detox and Cleanse Complete, Clean Program, Tava Tea, Red Smoothie Detox, UltraClear and the hundreds of other promotions promising cleansing and detox diets, Leptitox is peddled by scam artists who  know exactly what to say and do to convince people to buy that $50 bottle of potion or pills that will supposedly change your life.  There is a big difference between these cons and diets, like that popularized by former President Bill Clinton, which focus on healthy eating.   Lifestyle changes work — detox/cleanses simply don’t.  Could all of those marketers be lying?  Sadly, yes.

In 2009, a network of scientists assembled by the UK charity Sense about Science contacted the manufacturers of 15 products sold in pharmacies and supermarkets that claimed to detoxify. The products ranged from dietary supplements to smoothies and shampoos. When the scientists asked for evidence behind the claims, not one of the manufacturers could define what they meant by detoxification, let alone name the toxins. Or check out the detox dossier; a group of scientists examined 15 common “detox” products, from shampoo to juices to foot pads. All the products failed to explain what “toxins” they were combating or how their product worked, and there was no evidence of usefulness for any of them.

Most of the “toxins” that detox diets supposedly “cleanse” you of either don’t exist, or are nonissues because your body is completely capable of dealing with them on its own. “Too much food” is not a toxin, regardless of how guilty you might feel about it.  Yet, inexplicably, the shelves of health food stores and websites throughout the Internet are still packed with products bearing the word “detox” – it’s the marketing equivalent of drawing go-faster stripes on your car. You can buy detoxifying tablets, tinctures, tea bags, face masks, bath salts, hair brushes, shampoos, body gels and even hair straighteners. Yoga, luxury retreats, and massages will also all erroneously promise to detoxify. You can go on a seven-day detox diet and you’ll probably lose weight, but that’s nothing to do with toxins, it’s because you would have starved yourself for a week.

TRICK #3 –  Promise a Colon Cleanse

Leptitox also offers “colon cleanse” pills.   However, experts believe these are simply “casts” formed by the fiber contained in the “cleansing” products.   As the US National Library of Medicine states, “There is preliminary evidence to suggest that certain foods such as coriander, nori and olestra have detoxification properties, although the majority of these studies have been performed in animals….no randomized controlled trials have been conducted to assess the effectiveness of commercial detox diets in humans.”

Cleansing” products offer no additional benefit, and some can cause unnecessary bloating, cramps and diarrhea. As explained above, there is no evidence of any kind that toxins accumulate in the colon, or that they need to be “cleansed” or “flushed out.” You cannot help your body “detox” by taking harsh drugs that work on an organ completely unrelated to your detoxification system!  Taking a huge megadose of fiber and laxatives is not the way to better health. But these therapies — which include enemas and colonics, as well as laxatives and herbal remedies — are not medically useful, according to the Mayo Clinic.  A common “cleanse” is milk thistle – which has never shown benefits in any controlled studies. They’re generally low-quality supplements and not worth your money.

In fact, colon cleansing can sometimes be harmful. In fact, coffee enemas sometimes used in colon cleansing have been linked to several deaths. Colon cleansing can also cause less serious side effects, such as cramping, bloating, nausea and vomiting.Other concerns with colon cleansing are that it can:

  • Increase your risk of dehydration
  • Lead to bowel perforations
  • Increase the risk of infection
  • Cause changes in your electrolytes, which can be dangerous if you have kidney or heart disease or other health problems

Similarly, colonic irrigation (also called colon hydrotherapy) is intended to flush the entire length of the colon. Colon irrigation has a few legitimate medical uses, such as preparation for surgery or radiological endoscopy and for treating fecal incontinence, but its use for “detoxification” is irrational

OUR SUGGESTION:  Use Free Proven Weight Loss Plans Available on the Web

The vast majority of reputable health studies show that quick weight loss pills and potions simply don’t work.  If you are serious about exploring a diet aid, check out these free and reputable dieting and weight-loss resources for you on the Net:

Smart for Life

Livestrong Diet –  Aims for a loss of about 1-2 pounds per week.

GM Diet  –  It’s not really a General Motors-designed diet plan.  It’s actually a short one-week detox program.   But it could be a useful starter to a major personal diet reboot.  Linora Low gives a helpful (and free)  step-by-step video and written guide to how to do this detox program.

The Lose Weight Diet –  It does what many of the diet scammers do (take free  information and distill it down to 3 easily understood phases) but he actually offers it for free!

Contrahealthscam recommends Truth From Within (Truth About Keto It claims that this program by Brad Pilon is designed specifically for women in response to the 2017 keto craze that left a lot of women in hormonal disrepair. So if you are a woman who wants to lose weight the right way, Truth from Within is something you should try.   It also recommends Eat Stop Eat, also by Brad Pilon has been studied extensively and has stood the test of time.

And if you are serious about wanting to shed some pounds, begin by going to the Mayo Clinic’s free and reputable website.  The medical experts at the Clinic have fashioned a thoughtful and time-tested plan that has worked for untold numbers of people.  Effective weight loss requires you to master the habits, urges, and feelings that rule our lives.   It’s really all about learning more about your impulses.  Once you do, you can create your “new” normal and the pounds will begin to disappear.

But whatever you do, avoid Leptitox and its unproven, overpriced placebo pills.

86 replies
  1. Rebecca
    Rebecca says:

    I have been using this for a week already down pounds and my blood pressure that is usually 145/90 is now 121/80. Works for me!

    Reply
  2. Kelli Goodsir
    Kelli Goodsir says:

    I’m so glad I came across this site. Thank you so much for the honest review and saving me money

    Reply
  3. Linda
    Linda says:

    Ok so after reading this, I called the 800 number on the email sent for Click Bank.
    They answered and I told them I would like to cancel my order and transaction. Thru out the entire conversation, I kid you not there was a rooster crowing in the background, WTF!!
    That’s does not sound like a professional bank Institution. They said they would refund me and sent an email stating that, we shall see!
    I also canceled my bank card as well

    Reply
  4. patrick
    patrick says:

    well i got caught but they do suppress my appetite why probably because placebos can work or the mind wants it to work
    a prop can do wonders yes i do believe they r a scam but what works for one may not work for another

    Reply
  5. Michelle R
    Michelle R says:

    I ordered this product but got nervous and cancelled the next day and got a full refund luckely… however, I received the product anyway (must have shipped before I cancelled it) anyway should I take them anyway? The ingredients sound safe? Not sure what to do with 12 bottles now? anyone want to try them for free lol! I’ll send them to ya.. most likely going to throw them away after getting so many mixed reviews

    Reply
  6. Maggie
    Maggie says:

    I have been taking Leptitox for almost a month and have NOT lost weight! I wish I read this information before purchasing. I was on a chat with someone on the Clickbank site, and they instructed me to send all bottles back to an address provided, whether the bottles are empty or full. Once they receive the bottles, I will receive my refund. So mad at myself for falling for this!

    Reply
    • Kiki
      Kiki says:

      Hi, this is my second order of leptitox . On my first order of 3 bottles all the pills were white, on my second order that I just received the pills are light brown almost greenish. Questioning that was what brought me to this site. What is the color of your pills?Thanks!

      Reply
  7. Dexter
    Dexter says:

    This blog was… how do you say it? Relevant!! Finally I’ve found something about Leptitox which helped me. Thanks a lot!

    Reply
  8. Jean Semple
    Jean Semple says:

    I order this product without reading the reviews. Call their customer service informing them that I did not receive the stuff only to be told that the tracking number said it was.delivered to my address. I check with the carrier was told package was left at front door. Even though I explain to them they are giving me the run around and refuse to give me a refund. This Clickbank they all crooks.

    Reply
  9. Cheryl
    Cheryl says:

    This really sucks.just got mine yesterday after ordering it 3 weeks ago.Same thing happened where I couldn’t track it because it had never shipped. It is sad that you can’t even trust people today as they are all out for a fast buck. I will be sending it back soon and I better not get any crap about a refund.
    I have learned my lesson and wont trust another ad. I hope these people do get caught, put in jail and have the key thrown away sd they don’t deserve anything good to happen to them for this. Shame on them!!

    Reply
  10. SmarkD
    SmarkD says:

    Hey Gang,
    Always check for the SCAM first and foremost!!! They can and usually are FAKE and want your hard earned money with all the excuses they can come up with to KEEP your hard earned money for as long as they can—-whether you want it back or not—tough!!! Hard to really deal with scammers that pull at the heart strings to pull that money from your wallet…Karma dudes!!! It will come back to you many folds from what you do/did to all those people you stole from to line your own pockets…YOU ALL will answer to a higher power—Be warned!

    Reply
  11. Tina
    Tina says:

    Hi! This is my first read of your blog! I am a part of volunteers starting a new program in a community of the same subject.
    Your info offers some helpful information… good stuff.

    Reply
  12. Lannie
    Lannie says:

    Well, I bought it. My 2nd week and I am up and down 2 lbs. I am so glad I did not fall for all the other offers. So here I am with 3 Leptitox bottles and a Free colon Cleanse. I had checked on Web to see if it was a scam but I guess I got sided with all the other fraudulent adds and missed this one. I started to 2nd guess it when they gave me an 800 #, I called and its the ClickBank? Then I thought, why not someone to ask some questions about the product? Well thank You for this information. I will dump them right after I find they are giving me the run around.

    Reply
  13. Robin
    Robin says:

    It took awhile but I found a real review with no affiliations. Thank you! I do have a question tho…Dr Oz and Al Rocher (sp?) on the today show both have given testimonials about products that have been turned out to be scams. Is it about even more money than they already have? I find this confusing…what about their integrity??

    Reply
    • Alyssa
      Alyssa says:

      Never believe Dr. Oz or any of the people you see on tv. They are, first and foremost, ACTORS. Whether or not they actually have degrees is irrelevant. They don’t care about you or anyone else. They only care about padding their pockets the same as every other scammer.

      Reply
  14. lisa
    lisa says:

    Just bought it and I will try only one bottle and everyone is so different. Nothing to lose but weight and all natural cant be too bad. I do not that you do not have to not change your diet. That is why we can weight!!!! Diet and exercise is a must. I have only lost 12 lbs in 3 months and limit sugar and carbs with exercise included. I will keep all posted and will start tomorrow. Thanks for the the reviews.

    Reply
  15. Tahira Kausar
    Tahira Kausar says:

    Im so glad i read this i was going to buy leptitox so desperately.
    Im willing to try anything even thou i was once scammed of £88 from purchasing a trial bottle online to which they were only suppose to take out post n packaging but after a month helped themselved to £88 which i never could get back.

    Reply
  16. Frances
    Frances says:

    I as well as another commentator did try Leptitox and had lost 15 pounds in less than 2 months. I believe your mind has a greater influence on your body. If you have positive thoughts about something it will happen. Had I read this article before trying Leptitox it probably wouldn’t have worked but then again it might have…who knows?

    Reply
    • Lucretia
      Lucretia says:

      I had a similar experience. 16 lbs down, I don’t care if it’s placebo effect or not, it helped. Now I’m hoping I didn’t mess up by ordering more.

      Reply
      • Coco
        Coco says:

        Also lost stubborn weight on this supplement. The ingredients when researched have aided in appetite, weight loss. I do exercise daily, but had been before starting this. Worked for me. I don’t care why!

        Reply
      • Tanya
        Tanya says:

        I do not see anybody here who used it more than 3-4 month…I would like to check with you later and see how fast you will gain you weight back and how much….or you plan to use these pills all your life?
        Please let us know in s6-8 months how do you feel and how is your weight doing.

        Reply
        • Harold Keathley
          Harold Keathley says:

          Well I’m here to tell you that Iv’e been taking them for 4 months now. Still waiting on my weight loss to kick in.

          Reply
      • Beth
        Beth says:

        Just started this diet and already feel better ,noticed bloating down and more energy. What works for some may indeed not work for everyone, Be your own judge.

        Reply
  17. Margie
    Margie says:

    Glad I saw this! I was going to use it as a sugar detox supplement. Not anymore! Can we use this website to confirm other products we are curious about before buying them??

    Reply
  18. Anne Boul
    Anne Boul says:

    I was just about to try these but thought I would have a look to see if anyone had used them came across this site great feeling not
    To have been taken for a ride

    Reply
  19. Denise
    Denise says:

    Thank you so much for reporting on this, as I too was almost sucked in to their lies 🙄 Shame on them and lots of praise to you for helping gullible people like me x

    Reply
  20. Tahoe Momma
    Tahoe Momma says:

    When ever I come across a product that I find too good to be true I immediately pause the video and check the reviews on the product and it always comes out the same. It’s a scam ‼️ I am so thankful for all of your comments that help me cut through the bull and gets me to the truth.

    Reply
    • Marilyn
      Marilyn says:

      Yep. That’s what I do now. I spend over $100 on keto pills and actually the pills did nothing for me except made my already bloated stomach even more so. I don’t think there is a pill out there that can help with diet unless you like side effects. There is always a side effect. So what I do is continue to workout and watch portion control, drink lots of water and no junk food (once a week only).

      Reply
  21. concerned01
    concerned01 says:

    I was considering genuine options to market. I was looking into this product and I came across your review. I am so glad I did.
    Needless to say, I WILL NOT MARKET IT.
    I cannot be part of something that rips other people off. It is just not right.

    Reply
  22. zippcat1000
    zippcat1000 says:

    Thanks for your info. I’ll add I’m finally cautious and exhausted enough to check reviews before signing up and buying too “good to be true” products. As I’ve only read a few of your followers feedback, I very much resonate.

    Reply
  23. Alex Castillo
    Alex Castillo says:

    Thank you for the review. I’ll stick with weight loss solution proven at Mayo Clinic using green coffee bean extract (in veggie capsules only). Available at any health food store.

    Reply
  24. Brenda G Moton
    Brenda G Moton says:

    I almost purchased when I received a pop-up and screen offer disappeared. I went to google site Leptitox and saw scam. I glad that your testament helped me not to get scammed. Keep believing in yourself and monitor your portiona drink plenty of water, eat fruits and fresh cooked and raw vegetables but most importantly exercise the natural way.

    Reply
  25. Dee
    Dee says:

    I am glad I read the scam report. Very few of these pills that is advertised on the Internet for weight loss actually work. Do what I did, drink a apple cider vinegar solution…..2 tablespoons in 6 or 8 ounces of h20 with or without 1 teaspoon of raw honey.

    Reply
  26. Natasha Cuellar
    Natasha Cuellar says:

    I bought this product about a month ago they charged my card Never Send me the product.
    They do not have a phone number on the website I have tried to send emails and they just giving me the runaround.
    Please don’t go to the website and don’t purchase their product

    Reply
    • mshames
      mshames says:

      Leptitox is an e-book product. You have to download it. If you choose to cancel it, you should ask for a refund through the vendor that sold it (probably Clickbank).

      Reply
      • Melissa
        Melissa says:

        Their phone # is 800-390-6035. Don’t bother asking for a refund. They tell you once the shipping label is created you have to wait for the shipment then return it with complete details. Then once received (and if determined the details were complete enough) they will start the refund process which can take 3-5 business days. I got a shipping label, but when tracking the number I learned it never shipped. But since a label was “created” they can’t process a refund. BUT guess who can, my credit card company.

        Reply
      • Kelly A kiedrowski
        Kelly A kiedrowski says:

        Leptitox is not a e book. By the way its pills…and I been taking leptitox for a few months now it has helped me lose weight. No matter what you buy there’s always a chance it wont work. Not everything works for everybody.

        Reply
  27. Rental
    Rental says:

    The same story was told about the firefighter whose wife lost her vision and could not see their daughter’s ballet recital, he found the same people and came back to the states where he’s selling other supplements that heals the eye.

    Reply
  28. Georgina
    Georgina says:

    Good review…thank you! I cannot comment about the scam, but tried Leptitox and it helped me to lose weight – lost 20lbs. I guess everyone is different.

    Reply
    • mshames
      mshames says:

      This commenter did not disclose that she is associated with a website that sells this product to the general public.   She appears to have coordinated her comment with another person named Nataylia, which we did not print because it duplicates Georgina’s comment. 

      Reply
      • Carm
        Carm says:

        You mentioned Mayo Clinic’s are free if you go on website to as for help on dieting. Not true. They ask for a $65.00 3 month fee to help you get started with learning how to lose weight. Just know that nothing in this world is
        free.

        Reply
        • mshames
          mshames says:

          Our link to the Mayo clinic does provide for free information. Further, our website has extensive information and links to a number of legitimate and proven diet options. And it is most assuredly free.

          Reply
        • Sally Jean Becker
          Sally Jean Becker says:

          Not only doesn’t it work but the colon cleanse had the opposite affect on me. Instead of cleansing my colon, it bound me up more & I have a chronic condition so after 3-4 days I quit. Miralax serves me so much better – withing 2 hrs of taking that I get results.

          Reply
        • Sally Jean Becker
          Sally Jean Becker says:

          I have had more success with just watching the carbs, 45-60 per meal with 1 fifteen carb snack in the morning and one in the afternoon.Find a list of carbs somewhere on the internet & watch those carbs.

          Reply
  29. Viorica Noe
    Viorica Noe says:

    With sadness, after reading this I realized that I was stupid enough to buy this weight loss Leptitox pills. IT’S TRUE , IT DOESN’T WORK. I USED A WHOLE BOTTLE AND DIDN’T LOSE 1 OZ

    Reply
    • Kathrym
      Kathrym says:

      I wish I had this information before I ordered Liptitox. My order came in the mail today. I am going to try it anyway but I have no expectations for success now. I keep hoping for a miracle. It’s a shame that deceivers continue to prey on people who battle with obesity.

      Reply
    • Carla
      Carla says:

      my favourite part is that the product does not have to be approved by the FDA because it is made in an FDA and GMP approved laboratory. If only registering a new product was that easy !!!!

      Reply
    • Sally Jean Becker
      Sally Jean Becker says:

      Not only doesn’t it work but the colon cleanse had the opposite affect on me. Instead of cleansing my colon, it bound me up more & I have a chronic condition so after 3-4 days I quit. Miralax serves me so much better – withing 2 hrs of taking that I get results.

      Reply
        • Baby
          Baby says:

          Yeah, well the CDC also recommends giving Guardacil (sp) vaccines to teenage girls, despite tragic side effects, including death. Let’s face it, the CDC is a tool of Big Pharma who wants us to use their products.
          Finally, the bias of this site is 100% questionable as indicated by the ad for Sublocade to “treat” opiod addiction, along with counseling….. yeah, skip the pill, go straight to counseling.

          Reply
          • Keto O
            Keto O says:

            Exactly my point. I have not ordered the product and not sure if I will but this review is really questionable. There is no harm in trying all natural stuff, if truly it’s natural.

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