scamProtecting your privacy has taken on greater importance in light of the high-profile hacking and cyberbullying stories that have flooded the Web in recent years.   So leave it up to unscrupulous Cybermarketers to come up with “privacy” protection schemes that amount to little more than repackaging of free information.   They come with different names: Patriot Privacy KitEasy On-Line Privacy, Privacy War, Privacy Crisis and others.   Most all of these marketers want between $27-$39 of your money to tell you how to protect your “money, property and identity”….usually from the government.  They all are very heavy on inflammatory language about how your are being subjected to surveillance that could ruin your life and that of your family.   Many of them boast  slick videos that trot out a parade of horrible scenarios.

There’s a reason this sales pitch is slick — they spend a lot of marketing money to get it to you.   Who is paying for that?  You are.   And, like many scammers, they are using Clickbank to sell their ebook so don’t assume you’ll get a refund.  “Rock solid guarantee”…..don’t bet on it.   The scammers bet on the fact that most consumers won’t seek refunds until after the guarantee period expires.   In fact, they count on it.

If you look for a review of the product, you are deluged with lots of fake review or “scam” sites that simply direct you to the main sales site or offer some officious pablum talking about how the product is highly rated or recommended.   The marketers for this service pay commission for any referrals they generate.   So these “affiliate marketers” create create fake review sites which effectively thwart any customer who is looking for real reviews.   It is also a tactic to obscure any customers who have posted complaints or alerts about fraudulent claims.  This affiliate marketing trick makes it very difficult for consumers to detect this and other such scams,  As one persevering blogger has noted, scam artists rely upon these fraudulent reviewers to be using tags like:  “does it work?”, “is it a scam?” or “verified review” to suck unsuspecting consumers into this fraud.

We haven’t ordered the literature being peddled by this company because most all of this information is available for free on the Internet.    Want good, independent privacy information and tips?   Go to Privacy Rights Clearinghouse  (editor’s note:  We helped create this organization and know it to be reputable).  All of the information you need to protect your privacy is offered for the highly-discounted fee of FREE.  Or go to the Privacy Blog at EPIC for more free and accurate info.

Want to send emails or shop anonymously?   Go to WikiHow and read all about how to use your browser, firewall and pre-paid cards to “disappear” on the Web and yet still send emails or shop online. Or go to WonderHowTo for more FREE tips about anonymous commerce.

Want to read about privacy horror stories?   Go to Pew Charitable Trust’s evaluations of Internet safety orits report on anonymity.   This is a reputable and well-resourced public information nonprofit who compile verifiable data that many good policy makers use in formulating laws and rules.   It is a high quality source of information.

Is this a scam?   Probably not…..they are selling a book of dubious value.  But you don’t have to spend $27 or $39 to get information about how to lose weight. And beware ANY Net-based sales pitch that has uncredentialed, slick video presentations with no independent reviews. It may not be a scam, but it is probably a rip-off because it is overpriced for what it is offering.   In this case, there’s lots of good vision exercises in the marketplace offered at a fraction of the cost of most weight loss schemes.   Save your hard-earned money.

One additional warning:  once you give them your money, you’ll be tagged as “meat”.  Once they know that you’ll fall for this pitch, the same marketers will be coming back to you over and over and over for other such pitches.  So understand that if you pay these marketers anything….let alone $40…..they’ll continue to hound you with more slick schemes designed to prey on your fears and concerns.  Our advice: don’t open your door or wallet to them. Better to avoid a questionable deal than to have to complain about it afterwards.    Our experience with such offers is that complaints will fall upon deaf, if not disappeared, ears.  We sort of wish opportunistic marketers like this company would make themselves more………….private.